Asia Business Journal – Corporate and Interior Photography

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 - MRID (Interior Photography)

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013

For me the true essence of “Portraiture” is getting the right emotion and the truthfulness of the subject – in that case how do you shoot a corporate portrait? It seems easy when you think of it ’cause it looks like a straight-forward bust-shot or just a full body shot… not exactly! Unless you’re taking an ID Photo then you can get away with that. You don’t wanna make the client/office staff looks like the next candidate for “Awkward-Family-Photos-Dot-Com”.

I have to make an impression to the viewers that the subject/client is “legit”, “reliable” and “trust worthy”. People won’t invest any time or money on people looking like rag-tag hooligans. Behind every corporate photo is a company that means serious business, not necessarily means you have to be very serious in taking photos you can also have fun but mind the purpose of your assignment. Corporate photography is always an interesting subject for me; having said that, it’s the least of my favorite compare to the next subject which is – Interior Photography.

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 - HLA (Corporate Photography)

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 – HLA (Corporate & Product Photography)
Left Page: Hilda Loe on a sitting pose
Right Page: Product shot

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 – HLA (Corporate Photography)

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 – HLA (Corporate & Product Photography)
Left Page: Product shot
Right Page: Hilda Loe on a standing pose

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 – HLA (Corporate Photography)

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 – HLA (Corporate & Product Photography)
Left Page: Hilda Loe behind the desk
Right Page: Product shot

Interior photography on the other hand is one of my favorite assignments It might take a while to set up and much more time consuming but at least no model/client/subject complaining about a certain (awkward) pose or position (can’t blame them ’cause it’s really hard). The only hard time I had on an interior photography assignment was when I got this visible spots on my sensor and because I have to go for a lower aperture value for maximum sharpness all the spots were very noticeable. This is the time when I brought my camera on a rainy mountain climbing trip, I somehow forgot to clean the sensor afterwards and after the assignment I end up doing a lot of post processing – my bad! Lesson learned: Take (extra) good care of your gear.

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 - MRID (Interior Photography)

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 – MRID Interior Photography (only)
Right Page – Top Left: Meeting Room
Right Page – Bottom Left: Conference Room

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 MRID (Interior Photography)

Asia Business Journal (APBA) 2013 MRID Interior Photography (only)
Right Page (only):
Top Left – Holding Area
Top Middle – Reception Area
Top Right – Hallway
Middle – Reception Area
Bottom Left – Meeting Room
Bottom Right – Holding Area

Before and After Conference Room

Before and After Spot Removal – Conference Room

As you can see from the example above dirty spots were visible almost entirely around the image. A lot of cloning/ healing/ patching and patience were involved in the process and this is just one image imagine repeating the process on 50 images (seriously). In this image I used the Nikon 16-35mm F4 VR, some might wonder F4 is not fast enough for indoor lighting conditions which true but I don’t shoot wide open on interior photography. Remember you need to make the whole scene as sharp as possible without any out-of-focus areas. You’ll think this is crazy thinking the whole image will be darn dark or if you crank up the ISO sensitivity it will be ugly noisy? This is when a tripod and a remote shutter release will come in handy. Shoot in long exposure and use your imagination then you’re good to go. Another thing is that ultra wide angle lenses has noticeable barrel distortion. This can be easily fixed on Lightroom. I won’t be discussing the steps here ’cause you can find that almost everywhere on the web, don’t be lazy “Google it!” or “YouTube it!”.

Gears Used (Interior Photography)

– Nikon D700

– Nikon 16-35mm F4 VR

– CPL Filter (for unwanted reflections)

– FotoPro MGC-584N Tripod

– Remote Trigger (for long and multiple exposures)

– Nikon Speedlights SB-900 and SB-600 (if needed)

Gears Used (Corporate Photography)

– Nikon D700

– Nikon 24-70mm F2.8G

– Nikon 70-200mm F2.8G VR II

– Nikon 50mm F1.4G

– Nikon Speedlights SB-900 and SB-600

– Lightstand

– Radio Flash Triggers

– Aurora Firefly Beauty Box Lighting attachment

Aknowlegement: Special thanks to MRID Studio and Hilda Loe Associates for trusting in my work. I’m no Ansel Adams or Alexander Rodchenko but I’m really glad you like what I do. Cheers!!!

Note: All Photos use on publication is property of MRID Studio and Hilda Loe Associates. Photos posted on this article where taken by Canon 60D and Canon 16-35mm F4L.

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